FeGGT LifeProTM Health Risk Calculator

How Our Risk Calculator Works

First, go to our Who Should be Tested page and select the conditions or Baseline Risk factors that you know you already have. Then add the red Risk Points (all equal to 1Risk Point) to arrive at your total Baseline Risk Score. If your in great health that number will be zero. All others will score between 1 and 10 Risk Points. Baseline Risk Points totaling above 10 will not be counted in our algorithms.

Then select one of  three tables from below based on your gender, and if your a female, your menopausal status. Add your Baseline Risk Score, if any, (from above) to the total red numbers (i.e., Risk Score) above your FeGGT LifePro™ blood test results range bracket for each of the four test categories listed: Serum Ferritin (SF), Transferrin Saturation % (TS%), GGT and Hemoglobin (HgB). Further instructions for Risk Score tabulation can be found below the tables.

 

Risk Score Tabulation

The total of your FeGGT LifePro™ blood test Risk Score when added to your Baseline Risk Score will be between zero (0) and a theoretical maximum of 35 Total Risk Score Points. The risk scores are already adjusted for gender and menopausal status differences. You can then find the risk category that matches your Total Risk Score in the below scoring table:

Health-e-Iron - Important notes about your risk score

Health-e-Iron note: The following information is based on the scientific literature posted on this web site in our Science Libraries and also from reliable sources in the medical and scientific community

  • Individuals over the age of 70 can reduce their FeGGT LifePro™ blood test and therefore their total Risk Scores by 1 point; and those over the age of 75 by 2 points.
  • High, Very High and above blood test scores among those in mid-life and younger predict relatively worse outcomes when compared to age-matched peers having comparable Baseline Risk Scores.
  • For individuals with relatively high blood test iron scores (SF, TS% or both), blood tests results including some Baseline risk factors can be expected to improve rapidly as iron reduction is achieved (see our Iron Reduction Therapy page)
  • For individuals with relatively high GGT, well-tolerated dietary modifications including replacing some or all foods like red and processed meats and most "fast foods" with a diet based on, or including, regular consumption of ample portions of nutrient dense, whole foods containing natural antioxidants and other protective nutrients or food constituents. Nuts, whole grain breads, fruits and vegetables, legumes (including peanut butter), coffee, chocolate and cocoa rank among the best of healthy food choice (see our GGT & Healthy Foods and More Healthy Foods Science Library pages).
  • Individuals with FeGGT LifePro™ GGT scores of 5 or above, combined with one iron score of 3 or above (either SF or TS) should add 2 risk points to their score. Individuals in this  risk category (i.e., both high iron and high GGT) face heightened risks of chronic disease development and premature mortality, even if their baseline risk scores are zero. High iron and  GGT combine synergistically to cause cell, tissue, DNA and organ damage. The damage process can remain virtually invisible until the onset of serious chronic disease or acute condition leading to early mortality. Fortunately, these conditions can be corrected when a combined strategy of iron reduction and healthy diet planing is followed.
  • Importantly, those with the overall highest risk scores can expect to achieve the greatest improvement in risk scores by adhering to a healthy diet regimen, and when indicated, reducing their iron levels. As indicated by the scientific literature on this web site and elsewhere, following these important guidelines can improve both future blood test results and several Baseline Risk Factors in the process.
  • Conversely, the scientific literature demonstrates that those with blood test Risk Scores of zero (0) will not be able achieve a degree of risk reduction commensurate with what can be achieved by higher-risk individuals.

Please scroll down and browse through condensed excerpts from our Science Libraries. We believe after doing so most people will be able to envision the bases upon which our risk algorithms are constructed. More detailed information, including many full text, peer-reviewed articles and research reports, as well as many more charts, images and tables can be found throughout the Science Libraries on our Health-e-Iron web site. 

 GGT: data-derived Risk Tables and Graphs

The table directly below was derived from the data reported in study #10 on our GGT-Heart page

 

Figure 3 from the above study appears below

 

 Fig. 3. Adjusted mortality among patients according to subgroups of GGT. GGT was classified as described in Materials and Methods. The lowest category served as reference category.

 

The table directly below is derived from the data reported in study #6 on our GGT-Heart page

 
 

The table directly below was derived from the data reportrd in article #7 on our GGT-Heart page

 

Figures 1 and 2 from the above study appears below 

 

 

 

The table directly below was derived from the data report in study #2 on our GGT-Heart page

The table below was derived from the data reported in study #11 on our GGT-Heart page

Figure 2 from the above study appears below


 

 

The table below was derived from the data reported in study #1 on our GGT-Diabetes page

 Monitoring Trends and Determinants on Cardiovascular Diseases (MONICA) Augsburg Survey


 

The table below was derived from the data reported in study #2 on our GGT-Diabetes page

Finland - Observational cohort study among 20,158 middle-aged men and women

 

Figure 1 from the above study is below. Of special note here is that GGT in the upper half of the population range increased the risk of diabetes by 100% in normal BMI ranges, by 150% in the overweight BMI range and by 268% in the obese BMI ranges (after adjusting for several relevant factors)

A study from the U.S. demonstrated very similar results to those directly above. The bar graft below can be viewed in the Free full text article #13 available on our GGT-Diabetes page.

Another similar bar graph from a large study done in Italy demonstrates results consistent with the above graphs. The bar graft below can be viewed in the Free full text article #12 available on our GGT-Diabetes page.


The table below was derived from the data reported in study #9 on our GGT-Diabetes page. This was a population of male construction workers who were reported to experience a significantly higher premature mortality rate than age-matched, white-collar workers in Germany.

 

The table directly below was derived from the data reported in study #24on our GGT-Diabetes page

 France - Data from the Epidemiological Study on the Insulin Resistance Syndrome (DESIR) cohort


The table below was derived from the data reported in study #1 on our GGT-Cancer page

 Guernsey (U.K.) Cohort Study - 4,714 Women (in Quartiles) - Data from a Cancer Research Study


The table below was derived from the data reported in study #13 on our GGT-Cancer page

Sweden 545,460 Persons and 37,809 Primary Cancers


Figure 1 from study #20 in our GGT-Cancer Library is reproduced below. This graph demonstrates how high GGT facilitates cancer metastasis. This results in part by the release of iron from transferrin, a pro-oxidant capacity of elevated GGT that is described in several articles in our libraries.


IRON: data-derived Risk Tables and Graphs

The table below was derived from the data reported in study #10 on our IRON-Cancer page


Figure 1 from study #2  on our IRON-Heart page appears below (odds of carotid plaque development)

Figure 2 from study #5 on our IRON-Heart page appears below (risk of atherosclerosis)

 

Figure 3 from study #5 on our IRON-Heart page appears below (risk of atherosclerosis)

Figure 2 from study #19 on our IRON-Heart page appears below (risk of acute myocardial infarction)


Figure 3 from study #19 on our IRON-Heart page appears below (risk of acute myocardial infarction)


Figure 2 from study #29 on our IRON-Heart page appears below (elevated transferrin saturation & mortality)


Figure 3 from study #30 on our IRON-Heart page appears below (elevated transferrin saturation & mortality)


Figure 1 from study #45 on our IRON-Heart page appears below (risk of myocardial infarction)



Figure 3 from study #4 on our IRON-Cancer page appears below (female breast cancer)

Figure 1 from study #9 on our IRON-Cancer page appears below (transferrin saturation, dietary iron & cancer)

 

The table below was derived from the data reported in study #10 on our IRON-Cancer page



Figure 1 from study #13 on our IRON-Cancer page appears directly below (with minor labeling adaptations). Elevated Transferrin Saturation and Mortality study. In this large U.S. population study baseline transferrin saturation measurements were taken in 1971. Approximately 2.3% of this population had baseline TS% of  >55%. During the subsequent 22-years, individuals having baseline TS% above 55% experienced a 60% greater rate of premature mortality.

 

Figure 2 from study #14 on our IRON-Cancer page appears below (transferrin saturation & mortality)


Figure 1 from study #15 on our IRON-Cancer page appears directly below (iron, cholesterol & cancer)

 Figure 1.Kaplan-Meier Curves of time to the Development of Cancer with Elevated Iron and
Cholesterol
, defined as > the 75th Percentile*


Figure 1 from study #17 on our IRON-Cancer page appears directly below (iron, lipids & cancer)

 

Figures 1 and 2 from study #36 on our IRON-Cancer page appears directly below (dietary iron, transferrin saturation & mortality)


Figures 1 and 2 from study #36 on our IRON-Cancer page appears  below (cancer, transferrin saturation & meta-analysis)

Fig. 1 Absolute 10-year risk of any cancer by transferrin saturation levels and haemochromatosis genotype C282Y⁄C282Y. Based on 8,763 individuals from the Copenhagen City Heart Study followed for 15 years, during which time 1,417 developed cancer.

 

Fig. 2 Meta-analysis of prospective studies of risk of any cancer (transferrin saturation ≤60% vs. reference group). The reference groups varied slightly across studies (≥30% to <60%) (see Supplementary Table S3). Horizontal lines indicate confidence intervals, and filled circles show the risk estimates.

 

Figure 1 from study #6 on our IRON-Diabetes page appears below (ferritin, transferrin saturation and metabolic syndrome

Figure 1—Age-adjusted ORs (95% CI) for the 6-year incidence of the IDF-defined metabolic syndrome according to high ferritin and transferrin levels (both above the upper tertiles) (A), lower ferritin and high transferrin levels (B), high ferritin and lower transferrin levels (C), and lower ferritin and lower transferrin levels (D). High and low levels were defined according to the three groups: men, premenopausal women, and postmenopausal women (DESIR).


Figure 1 from study #7 on our IRON-Diabetes page appears directly below (elevated ferritin and metabolic syndrome)


Figure 1—Standardized ORs for the 3-year incidence of hyperglycemia (IFG or type 2 diabetes) according to baseline iron biomarkers and CRP (independent variables) after adjustment for baseline age, BMI, WHR, and glucose and insulin concentrations in the DESIR study. (All independent variables and adjustment variables were included in the same multiple logistic regression equation.)


Figure 1 from study #9 on our IRON-Diabetes page appears directly below (elevated ferritin and metabolic syndrome)



Figure 1—Mean serum ferritin levels by the number of metabolic syndrome components. Geometric mean values of serum ferritin are shown for premenopausal women (black bar), postmenopausal women (white bar), and men (gray bar). Error bars represent upper 95% CI. The trend of increasing mean ferritin values across categories of metabolic syndrome components was significant for all three groups (P < 0.05).

 

Figure 1 from study #14 on our IRON-Diabetes page appears directly below (elevated ferritin and insulin resistance syndrome)

Figure 1 Serum ferritin levels in male (white boxes) and female (grey boxes) individuals discriminated according to the presence or absence of defining criteria of the insulin resistance syndrome (A–F). Results are depicted as boxplots. The top and bottom of each box indicate the 25th and the 75th percentiles. The line through the box is the median, and the error bars are the 5th and 95th percentiles. Significance levels were determined by the Mann–Whitney U-test and are indicated in the figure.

 

Figure 1 from study #15 on our IRON-Diabetes page appears directly below (ferritin predictive of new-onset type-2 diabetes)

Fig. 1 Odds ratios and 95% CIs for the association of clinically raised ferritin (group 5) vs ferritin in the normal range (groups 1–4) with incident diabetes in men and women, with adjustment for factors as stated (described in methods). FH, family history; LFT, liver function tests (ALT and GGT)

 

Figure 1 from study #26 on our IRON-Diabetes page appears directly below (ferritin predictive of new-onset type-2 diabetes)


 


 

Figure 2 from study #35 on our IRON-Diabetes page appears directly below (ferritin predictive of new-onset type-2 diabetes in relation to metabolic syndrome)

FIG. 2. OR and 95% confidence interval (CI) for type 2 diabetes according to joint classification of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and ferritin concentrations. The ORs were adjusted for age, sex, region, residence, BMI, smoking, drinking, physical activity, education levels, dietary factors, and family histories of diabetes. P for interaction = 0.40. White circles, OR for subjects without MetS; black circles, OR for subjects with MetS; black bars, 95% CI; broken line, odds ratio = 1.

 

Figures 1 and  3 from study #59 on our IRON-Diabetes page appears directly below (ferritin and type-2 diabetes)



Services not available in RI, MA, MD, ND, NE, NJ, NY, SD, and VT

VIDEO LINKS

[Health-e-Iron note: Reminder, when GGT is elevated, glutathione and most other antioxidants are insufficient!]

"Understanding Antioxidants" (2:31)

"Free Radical Damage" the rusting process (7:08)

"Antioxidants vs. free radicals" (3:10)

Dr. Oz on "Glutathione. The master antioxidant" (3:10)

Dr. Oz on “Cancer Fighting Antioxidants”

Part 1 of "Oz on Cancer & Antioxidants" (10:44)

Part 2 "Oz on & Antioxidants" (11.27)



Dr. Mercola on "Is iron helping or slowly killing you?"

Dr. Mercola on iron as "anti-antioxidant?" (8:44)


To learn more about the antioxidant protection afforded by various fruits, you can read more on this site:

 Fruitsinfo.com

To learn about the health benefits of peanuts and get some tasty recipes, try this site:

TheSkinnyonNuts.com


VIDEO LINKS

[Health-e-Iron note: Reminder, when GGT is elevated, glutathione and most other antioxidants are insufficient!]

"Understanding Antioxidants" (2:31)

"Free Radical Damage" the rusting process (7:08)

"Antioxidants vs. free radicals" (3:10)

Dr. Oz on "Glutathione. The master antioxidant" (3:10)

Dr. Oz on “Cancer Fighting Antioxidants”

Part 1 of "Oz on Cancer & Antioxidants" (10:44)

Part 2 "Oz on & Antioxidants" (11.27)



Dr. Mercola on "Is iron helping or slowly killing you?"

Dr. Mercola on iron as "anti-antioxidant?" (8:44)


To learn more about the antioxidant protection afforded by various fruits, you can read more on this site:

 Fruitsinfo.com

To learn about the health benefits of peanuts and get some tasty recipes, try this site:

TheSkinnyonNuts.com